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Poster Presentations

Poster Presentation Winners

April 7th April 8th
1st Place: Hailey Boeck
Mentor: Dr. Isaac Sleadd, Department of Biology
Cross-tolerance in the upside-down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana


2nd Place: Jordan Swinford
Mentor: Dr. Tera Kirkman, Department of Nursing (Traditional)
Should They Stay or Should They Go? Nurses' Perspectives on Family Presence During Resuscitation


3rd Place: Anthony Keyes
Mentor: Dr. Eric O'Neal, Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER)
Stability of Urine Specific Gravity across Time and Temperature
1st Place: Sarah Schiavone
Mentors: Dr. Larry W. Bates & Dr. Richard A. Hudiburg, Department of Psychology
Development and Psychometric Analysis of the Fandom Engagement Scale


2nd Place: Eddie Gordon
Mentor: Dr. Terry Richardson, Department of Biology, and
Dr. Jonathan Fleming, Department of Geography
Spatial distribution, size-frequency, and population dynamics of Bellamya japonica in a North Alabama pond


3rd Place: Katelyn Spidel
Mentor: Dr. Francis Koti, Department of Geography
US Military Presence in Africa: A GIS Analysis

All Participants

April 7
Poster Presentations
Location: GUC Atrium

April 8
Poster Presentations
Location: GUC Atrium
9:30 - 11:00 am
Hailey Boeck & Anna Hinson
Lyndsie Baily
Erin Cooper
Jeffrey Simpson
Danielle Dubroc
Anthony Keyes
2:00 - 3:30 pm
Lisa Dovoedo
Courtney Floyd
Jordan Swinford
Michaela Stafford
Haley Brown
9:00 - 10:30 am
Jordan Givens
Mary Ware
Brandon Miller
Sarah Shiavone
Katelyn Spidel
Kailee Neal

1:00 - 2:30 pm
Ella Thomas
Thomas Gordon
Brandy Gooch
Catherine Price
Julia Coldiron
Matt Allen

Research Day Abstracts


Global Human Trafficking

Presenter: Lyndsie Bailey
Mentor: Dr. Joy Borah, Department of Social Work

Human trafficking is an illegal movement of people. There are many causes of human trafficking, such as people from impoverished and low income households, ethnic minorities, indigenous people, refugees, illegal migrants, people with low education levels, and young girls running away from home. Globally there are twenty-seven million people trapped in slavery, sixty thousand are in the United States. The United States is mainly a destination for human trafficking victims. Roughly fourteen thousand to seventeen thousand victims are transported to the United States annually. The forms of human trafficking vary, a few forms include; forced labor, commercial sex trade, debt bondage, domestic servitude, illegal organ harvest, child soldiers, and child commercial sex trade. The most common perpetrators around the world are women; women trafficking women is the norm in most countries. Other perpetrators include familys luring individuals, families, and groups to come work for them, then trapping and enslaving the individuals. There are many policies that address human trafficking. The United Nations policy of 2000 is Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children. The United States policies include Trafficking Victims Protection Act, The Tariff Act, RICO, The Mann Act of 1910, The Protect Act, and National Defense Authorization Act of 2013. Recommendation to try and stop this issue suggest and have been acted on are reporting human trafficking suspicion when it is seen, develop national plans of action to end trafficking, and monitor internet usage of key words or websites traffickers may use.

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Cross-tolerance in the upside-down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana

Presenters: Hailey Boeck, Anna Hinson
Mentor: Dr. Isaac Sleadd, Department of Biology

Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a family of proteins that are produced constitutively and as a result of stressful conditions. They perform chaperone functions, stabilizing new proteins by aiding them in correct folding and also by refolding proteins that are damaged by stress. It has been suggested that HSPs may afford cross-tolerance to certain marine organisms. To explore this possibility, we investigated a potential role for HSPs during cross-tolerance in the upside-down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana. Animals exposed to acute heat stress (37 °C) and subsequent 24-hour recovery at 26 °C displayed increased salinity tolerance as measured by time to pulsing cessation and loss of responsiveness at 70 ppt. On average, heat-shocked C. xamachana survived 4.5 times longer than control animals following transfer to a hypersaline environment. To our knowledge, this is the first time cross-tolerance has been demonstrated in a true jellyfish. The above data are discussed in combination with protein-level analysis of HSP70 expression, with implications in ecophysiology and invasion biology.

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Childhood Immunization Schedules

Presenter: Haley Brown
Mentor: Dr. Tera Kirkman, Department of Nursing (Traditional)

This systematic review of the literature explores and addresses the trend of choosing an alternative immunization schedule or the complete avoidance of immunizations in children. The authors conducted a comprehensive search using CINAHL Plus with Full Text, MEDLINE, Health Source: Nursing/Academic edition, and PsycINFO databases to obtain and examine articles relevant to childhood immunization schedules. The initial search produced a population of 16,084 articles. After implementing the exclusion criteria, the number of articles was reduced to a sample size of five quantitative studies, varying in methodology. The inclusion criteria consisted of studies conducted in the last five years, written in English, and studies that used participants age 18 and younger. Findings revealed that participants described fear of side effects, perceived links to diseases, and reactions to vaccines as motivating factors in avoidance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended vaccination schedule. Further research is recommended to assess effectiveness of alternative vaccination schedules. Keywords: vaccine*, immunize*, alternate schedule, alternative schedule, traditional schedule

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B-vitamins and Depression

Presenter: Julia Coldiron
Mentor: Julie Tate, Department of Human Environmental Sciences

Depression in America has become the second leading cause of disability. A vast amount of Americans suffer with depressive symptoms and have no access to treatment due to financial constraints, a history of narcotic abuse, or other reasons. With an increasing number of Americans being diagnosed, an alternative treatment to the disease has become more and more prevalent. Several recent studies have been conducted to investigate the association between B-vitamins in the body and the incidence of depressive symptoms in adults. Four research articles were reviewed, two using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Evidence Analysis process in response to the PICO question: In patients with depression, could supplementing B-vitamins reduce the occurrence of depression symptoms? It was found that a majority of the evidence reviewed demonstrated that in particular subgroups of patients, supplementing B-vitamins along with traditional treatment, such as therapy, did experience a reduced occurrence of depression symptoms.

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Facebook creeping and DM sliding: An examination of social media and relationship jealousy

Presenter: Erin Cooper
Mentor: Dr. Amber Paulk, Department of Sociology and Family Studies

Social media sites and applications have gained substantial popularity since the early 2000s and as a result have had a significant impact on daily interpersonal communication. Social media makes contacting others easier than ever before, including relationship rivals, such as previous romantic partners as well as new potential partners. Individuals in romantic relationships are keenly aware of the possibility that their partners may use social media and networking sites to explore alternatives to their current relationship. Previous research has found that the use of social media and networking sites can elicit jealousy from romantic partners; however, previous research has focused almost exclusively on Facebook. The goal of the current study is to expand previous research and examine relationship jealousy across a variety of social media sites and applications, specifically Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, and Tinder. It is hypothesized that higher levels of access exclusivity on social media sites/applications will be associated with higher scores on measures of jealousy. Specifically, social media that allows less access exclusivity such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram will elicit less jealousy than those that allow more access exclusivity such as Snapchat and Tinder. Data are currently being collected through an online survey. To date, 252 individuals have participated. Data analyses will begin on March 12.

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The Efficacy of Aromatherapy in the Treatment of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

Presenter: Lisa Dovoedo
Mentor: Dr. Tera Kirkman, Department of Nursing (Traditional)

Historically, many eastern cultures have used aromatherapy for its healing properties; however, its use in traditional, western medicine is a contemporary concept. In the literature, aromatherapy has produced inconsistent results, particularly with its use in postoperative nausea and vomiting. The present study is a systematic review of the literature to assess the efficacy of the use of aromatherapy as a treatment for postoperative nausea and vomiting. Two databases, CINAHL and MEDLINE, were searched using the keywords 'aromatherapy' and 'nausea' and produced 96 articles. Seven (N=7) articles were retained based on the following criteria: inclusion criteria consisted of articles published since 2009, while articles not written in English, non peer-reviewed, and those that did not use quantitative methodology were excluded. Results of the systematic review indicate that no conclusive evidence has been found to support the use of aromatherapy in the treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting. Additional research is required to further investigate its efficacy. Keywords: aromatherapy, postoperative nausea and vomiting, antiemetic therapy

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HYDRATION EFFICIENCEY OF A PROTEIN BEVERAGE CONSUMED IN A BOLUS VS. METERED PATTERN DURING RECOVERY

Presenter: Danielle Dubroc
Mentor: Dr. Eric O'Neal, Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER)

This study compared hydration efficiency of a protein beverage consumed in a bolus (BOL) drinking pattern versus metered (MET) drinking pattern during recovery from exercise induced dehydration. Participants (n=10) dehydrated 2-2.5% in a laboratory. Breakfast and lunch were standardized for all participants during testing and a 6.5 hour recovery period during which data were collected. Fluid was administered at 125% of body weight lost during exercise. BOL was administered within the first hour of recovery, MET was administered 25% during the first 30 minutes, then 12.5% for the next 4 hours. Mean fluid intake was not significantly different between MET (2475 ± 324 ml) and BOL (2525 ± 293 ml). Mean urine production for BOL (1129 ± 164 ml) was significantly greater than MET (865 ± 190 ml). Mean hydration efficiency [fluid retained vs. consumed as a %] was significantly greater for MET (89.1% ± 16.3%) vs. BOL (73.7% ± 10.2%) (p = 0.004). Total urine production was higher for all 10 participants during BOL than MET demonstrating the consistency of results. Results indicate that the pattern in which a beverage is consumed may influence fluid retention and therefore hydration efficiency.

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Bariatric Surgery as a Treatment for Type II Diabetes

Presenter: Courtney Floyd
Mentor: Dr. Tera Kirkman, Department of Nursing (Traditional)

Abstract Objective: The aim of this systematic review is to adequately review relevant research conducted on the use of bariatric surgery to treat type II diabetes mellitus safely and more effectively than traditional methods. Methods: An appraisal of 11 studies was done to evaluate the effectiveness of bariatric surgery on glycemic control. These studies were retrieved from the following databases: CINAHL Plus with Full Text, MEDLINE, Academic Search Complete, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, and ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health. Original studies that focused on glycemic control, diabetes remission, the number of medications used to control diabetes before and after surgery, cost effectiveness, a comparison of traditional methods versus bariatric surgery, and comorbidities following bariatric surgery were included in this review. Results: Research suggests that bariatric surgery tends to produce more optimal outcomes than traditional methods of treating type II diabetes mellitus in adults with a BMI over 40, or 35 with at least one comorbidity. Bariatric surgery shows positive results including improved glycemic control, higher and sustained rates of diabetes remission, and a decrease in the use of insulin and oral antidiabetics. Conclusion: Patients with Type II diabetes struggle to obtain the weight loss needed to achieve and sustain glycemic control with traditional treatment methods alone. The use of bariatric surgery to treat type II diabetes mellitus is promising. Bariatric surgery provides successful outcomes and offers significant long-term benefits. Keywords: Bariatric surg* or weight loss surg* or gastric bypass, diabetes or diabetic, adult.

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Heat-shock protein expression during temperature and salinity stress in the Antarctic nemertean worm Parborlasia corrugatus.

Presenter: Jordan Givens
Mentor: Dr. Isaac Sleadd, Department of Biology

In recent years the Antarctic Peninsula has experienced a dramatic increase in annual temperature. The coastal marine environment has previously been extremely cold and stable, and consequently the majority of Antarctic species appear to have lost the ability to elicit a heat-shock response, thus making them ill-equipped to deal with elevated temperatures. The cold-adapted nemertean worm Parborlasia corrugatus is an important benthic scavenger and predator found throughout Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula. To our knowledge, no research has been conducted to analyze P. corrugatus's cellular response to heat and salinity stress and as a result it is unclear the effect that global climate change will have on these ecologically significant organisms. The goal of this study was to investigate Hsp70 expression using western blotting. Specimens were collected from the Ross Sea and experiments were conducted at McMurdo Station, Antarctica. Animals were exposed to acute heat stress (10°C) or salinity stress (28ppt or 24ppt) and protein levels of HSP70 “ a crucial molecular chaperone“ were determined. Here, we present our findings and discuss their implications in the context of global climate change.

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Celiac Disease and Down Syndrome

Presenter: Brandi Gooch
Mentor: Julie Tate, Department of Human Environmental Sciences

The purpose of this research is to identify if there is a frequency of Celiac Disease in children with Down syndrome by reviewing data from articles of past studies. The data collected will be related to the PICO question: In children with Down syndrome, should antibody blood testing be conducted to detect Celiac Disease? A frequency of reported cases of celiac disease found in Down syndrome individuals has been found to be significantly higher than the general population, yet there has not been any actions taken to routine screen these individuals. Four research articles were reviewed, two using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Evidence Analysis Process. The majority of the evidence demonstrated that early routine screenings for celiac disease can help to improve quality of life as well as help with intestinal discomfort as well as other serious health problems related to celiac disease.

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Spatial distribution, size-frequency, and population dynamics of Bellamya japonica in a North Alabama pond

Presenter: Thomas Gordon
Mentor: Dr. Terry Richardson, Department of Biology

Bellamya japonica, Japanese Mystery Snail, is a non-indigenous invasive species (NIS) from Asian appearing in North America in the late 1800’s. The occurrence of B. japonica in a pond in Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, Alabama is the first record of this species in the Tennessee River watershed. The spatial distribution, abundance and, size-frequency distribution of B. japonica across segregated sections in a lentic system was examined during 2014-15. Snails were sampled monthly by randomly choosing 15 locations from among thirty established positions throughout the pond and were grouped into twelve locations based upon depth and proximity to other samples. Population densities varied seasonally and spatially throughout the pond. Near shore in the central area of the pond had the highest density at 106.8 (± 21.36 SE) snails/m2 while the deepest areas at the north and south ends contained no individuals. Mean population density for the entire pond was 49.1 (± 8.27) snails/m2. Peak monthly densities for the pond were found in May at 44.1 (± 11.69) minimum densities of 1.4 (±1.42) found in April). Average shell length was 42.87 (± 2.30) mm and size-frequency data suggest that the population is an older population with a high mortality rate for juveniles. Distribution of snails throughout the pond suggests that environmental factors like DO2 or food availability may be differentially affecting population densities at various locations.

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Stability of Urine Specific Gravity across Time and Temperature

Presenter: Anthony Keyes
Mentor: Dr. Eric O'Neal, Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER)

Stability of Urine Specific Gravity across Time and Temperature Authors: AA Keyes, E O'Neal, KK Neal, BL Miller, JD Simpson, DR Dubroc Abstract There are a variety of methods to determine hydration status. The most practical method to assess hydration status is urine specific gravity (USG). The purpose of this study was to look at the potential change in USG over varying temperatures, room temperature and refrigerator temperature. Each sample was measured right after void, 2 hours later, and 24 hours later. 115 samples were successfully analyzed by three different refractometers at each time point and temperature by two technicians. There were no significant difference between USG at baseline compared to room temperature and fridge (p = 0.97, 0.95). Also no significance between USG at baseline compared to 2 hr or 24 hr (p = 0.97, 0.92). The values from the two digital refractometers, well and pen refractometer, correlated strongly with the manual refractometer (r = 0.97, 0.96). The results of this study show that urine samples can be collected over night or stored for a short period of time without any significant variation in USG values. Also the type of refractometer does not matter as long as proper care and technique is used during analysis.

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Effects of Hypohydration on Lactate Concentration During Constant-Load Cycling

Presenter: Brandon Miller
Mentor: Dr. J. Matthew Green, Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER)

This study examined effects of hypohydration on lactate concentration ([LA]) during 40 min steady workload cycling. Recreationally fit college aged males (n = 9) completed a cycling VO2 max trial and then two separate steady workload cycling trials under two conditions: heat exposed hypohydration (HPO) (~2.0% body weight), and hydrated (HYD) at a power output associated with 60%-80% of VO2max. A 2 (trial) x 6 (time point) repeated measures ANOVA showed a main effect for [LA] (p=0.02). Follow up t-test showed [LA] was significantly higher during HPO at 10, 30 and 40 min, and approached significance at 20 min (p = 0.097). There was a significant main effect for core temperature (Trec) (p = 0.035), RPE (p = 0.002), and HR (p = 0.036). Follow up t-tests indicate that Trec was significantly higher during HPO at 30, 40, and recovery (REC) time points. Follow up t-test indicate RPE was significantly higher for HPO at 20, 30, 40, and REC time points. Follow up t-test show HR was significantly higher during HPO at 10, 20, 30, 40, and REC time points. Paired t-tests revealed session RPE (p = 0.003) and resting HR (p = 0.031) was significantly greater for HPO. Perceived recovery status (PRS) (p = 0.007) showed participants reported feeling less well-recovered for HPO. Results indicate that hypohydration lead to greater [LA] during extended submaximal cycling bouts with a noteworthy rise in HR, Trec, and RPE.

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Effects of Caffeine on Perceptually-based Intensity Production During Outdoor Running

Presenter: Kailee Neal
Mentor: Dr. J. Matthew Green, Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER)

Research supports use of caffeine (CAF) as an ergogenic aid, benefiting aerobic performance and attenuating subjective estimation of intensity (RPE). However, the effects of CAF during RPE-production are not well understood. Therefore, this study examined effects of CAF (vs. placebo (PLA)) on selected velocity during outdoor running when intensity prescription is made using RPE. Participants (n=10) completed a VO2max trial and two running trials after ingesting 6 mg • kg-1 CAF or PLA. CAF and PLA treatments were randomly assigned, counterbalanced and administered in a double blind manner. Participants warmed up for 5 min at a self-selected pace, and then ran 1.5 miles at a prescribed RPE4 and then 1.5 miles at a prescribed RPE7, with a 10 min passive recovery between bouts. Velocity, heart rate (HR), and session RPE(S-RPE) were analyzed for both trials. Repeated measures ANOVA's, 2(trial) x 6(time point) revealed no statistical significance for RPE4 (CAF: 201.7 ± 25.8 vs PLA: 196.0 ± 17.5) and RPE7 (CAF: 236.7 ± 19.5 vs PLA: 231.8 ± 21.3). Similarly, no overall main effect for HR was found for RPE4 (CAF: 163 ± 12 vs PLA: 162 ± 14) or RPE7 (CAF: 181 ± 6 vs PLA: 178 ± 10). Paired T-tests revealed no significance for S-RPE4 (p=0.34) but did for S-RPE7 (p=0.04). Although no overall statistical significance was found for an increase in velocity after ingestion of caffeine, individual responses should be further investigated.

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Correlation Between Folate Supplementation and Autism Spectrum Disorders

Presenter: Catherine Price
Mentor: Julie Tate, Department of Human Environmental Sciences

The correlation of sufficient folic acid during pre/post conception and neural tube defects has been a highly researched topic in the nutrition world. The continuity of this; however, has brought to light in recent years whether autism could also be labeled as a probable outcome when not meeting the RDI for folate during these crucial months in a woman’s life and that of her developing fetus. Four research articles were reviewed, two using the Academy of Nutrition and dietetics Analysis process in response to the PICO question; among pregnant and periconceptional women does folic acid supplementation versus regular dietary consumption of folic acid affect reducing the risk of the child developing an ASD. The majority of the evidence reviewed demonstrated that there is a strong interdependence between adequate folate supplementation and preventing various degenerative and neurological conditions including neural tube defects, and ASDs. (ASD) Autism Spectrum Disorder; (RDI) Recommended Daily Intake

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Development and Psychometric Analysis of the Fandom Engagement Scale

Presenter: Sarah Schiavone
Mentors: Dr. Larry W. Bates & Dr. Richard A. Hudiburg, Department of Psychology

The term “fandom” refers to substantial fan followings formed around a science fiction or fantasy film, television show, or other popular media. Fandom engagement varies considerably among fans, and manifests through behavioral activities (e.g. convention attendance, cosplay, merchandise purchases, etc) and through psychological channels (e.g. social identity and self-perception [Harrington & Bielby, 2007]). Remarkably, empirical methods of assessing fandom engagement are lacking. This study sought to develop a scale to measure engagement in fandoms, levels of identification, and involvement between fans. Thus, the Fandom Engagement Scale (FES) was created with 17 items relating to fan self-perception, identity, behavior, and social dynamics. A sample of 675 participants completed questionnaires at fan conventions throughout the United Kingdom and The United States in 2014. Results of factor analyses suggest that, if reduced to a 15-item scale, the FES may provide a useful unidimensional measurement of fandom engagement addressing how fans' perceive themselves. This research encompasses a portion of a larger study being conducted exploring the influence on fandom on personal values and social beliefs.

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21-DAYS OF CHRONIC HYPERGRAVITY TRAINING IMPROVES TACTICAL ATHLETE SPECIFIC ANAEROBIC TASKS

Presenter: Jeffrey Simpson
Mentor: Dr. Eric O'Neal, Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER)

Technological improvements have reduced the weight of equipment tactical athletes (TA) wear or carry, but TA must still perform high intensity tasks in the field while wearing substantial external loads. The purpose of this study was to determine if a chronic hypergravity training (CHT) intervention could improve anaerobic task performance under load. Nine trained men completed 3 weeks of CHT which consisted of wearing a weighted vest equal to ~11% (week 1), 13% (week 2), and 16% (week 3) of body mass during daily living activities (4+ days/week; 8+ h/day) but not during training. Four tactical athletic performance tasks were practiced during two familiarization sessions before experimental trials. The tasks included a 5 flight, 53 step stair climb, 44 m zig-zag sprint with 2 points of change in direction and kneeling on one knee, 2 x 25 m casualty drag (84 kg), and 8 x 25 yard shuttle run. All tasks were completed while wearing a 12 kg vest. Percentage change in performance from pre- to post-intervention were compared between CHT and a 3 week control period (CON) using dependent t-tests, and Cohen's D effect size was calculated for absolute change in performance for each task. All tasks displayed trends of robust improvement from baseline to post CHT, followed by modest drops in performance during CON (p-value range = 0.03 to < 0.001; ES range 1.1 to 2.6). These results suggest the addition of CHT provides greater enhancement of occupational anaerobic task performances for TA than traditional training alone.

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US Military Presence in Africa: A GIS Analysis

Presenter: Katelyn Spidel
Mentor: Dr. Francis Koti, Department of Geography

After studying abroad in Tanzania last summer, my curiosity was raised as to where the violence in Africa I had heard about was occurring. I wondered where the patterns for violence existed and whether external factors served as contributors, namely whether the US was involved. I conducted research and analysis to determine whether there is a significant relationship between US military presence and violence on the continent of Africa. After gathering data on US presence and violence by country, I mapped data using ArcGIS for analysis. From there, I narrowed down which categories of violence and US military presence appeared most relevant. Presence was thus defined by an existence of one US military base or >23 troops, and violence was defined as having armed conflict, a travel advisory warning, or reported acts of terrorism. I employed chi-squared fitness tests, a means of statistical analysis to ascertain with 95% confidence the relationship between US military presence and violence on the continent. Preliminary results indicate no significant relationship between US military presence and violence in Africa, implicating that violence is not a driving factor for US military presence on the continent. This leads me to believe there are alternative purposes for US presence on the continent such as resource acquisition, which would be a good topic for further study.

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The Effects of Linen Biocidal Compounds on the Presence of Staphylococcus aureus

Presenter: Michaela Stafford
Mentor: Dr. Tera Kirkman, Department of Nursing (Traditional)

Background: Staphylococcus aureus has become a major threat to the health of patients. Many biocidal compounds are available that may be incorporated into linens used in hospitals to fight this type of bacteria. Aims: This systematic review seeks to examine the evidence of the effects of various biocidal compounds added to textiles on the presence of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. Methods: Six databases were searched for articles of original research that detailed the application of a biocidal compound to a textile and reported its effectiveness on the Staphylococcus aureus pathogen. Studies were excluded if not peer-reviewed, written before 2009, not written in English, not accessible in full text or not relevant to the purpose of the review. Results: Seven total studies were identified for inclusion: six by database search and one by hand search. One identified study was of cohort design in a hospital environment while the other six were experimental studies done in a controlled lab environment. All studies showed a reduction in the presence of S. aureus under individual research study conditions. Conclusions: All biocidal compounds examined proved to be effective at reducing the number of S.aureus pathogens present, and the prevalence of nosocomial infections caused by this bacteria can be reduced using these compounds. However, there is need for further research in this area. Studies need to be conducted in hospital settings where the linens will be used. Also, comparative studies of the effectiveness of the biocidal compounds, as well as studies of the costs of using treated linens, need to be performed.

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Should They Stay or Should They Go? Nurses' Perspectives on Family Presence During Resuscitation

Presenter: Jordan Swinford
Mentor: Dr. Tera Kirkman, Department of Nursing (Traditional)

Family Presence During Resuscitation (FPDR) is a highly controversial topic amongst medical personnel, patients, and the patient's family. Despite several advances in medicine and the evolution of the healthcare system, research regarding family presence in acute-care settings still needs to be both conducted and evaluated. In this qualitative systematic review, we examined nurses' perceptions of family presence during resuscitation in an effort to determine if and which protocols are supported by the evidence for or against FPDR. Databases searched include Medline (NLM), CINAHL Plus with full text, Health Source Academic, and PSYCHinfo. The focus of this review is to encompass the nurses' perceptions of how families react to witnessing resuscitation in conjunction with the experience of the healthcare team. The reports or statements made by nurses are illustrated in this review as positive or negative findings and then subsequently in terms of risks versus benefits. Based on the inconclusive data provided from the six studies that met the inclusion criteria, the authors concluded that further qualitative research that includes accounts of all parties involved during resuscitative efforts is highly recommended. Additionally, an increased research focus on FPDR within the U.S. healthcare system is specifically suggested. Keywords: family presence during resuscitation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, CPR, family witnessed resuscitation, FWR, nurs*, attitudes, perspectives

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Every Step Counts: Promoting Faculty/Staff Physical Activity During the School Day Through Technology

Presenter: Ella Thomas
Mentor: Dr. Lee G. Renfroe, Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER)

Current research identifies lack of physical activity or a sedentary lifestyle as a leading contributor to morbidity and mortality in our country. One growing effort to increase physical activity in people's lives and improve health is through an increased level of physical activity throughout the day. If that is to be accomplished, many people who work will have to put forth a special effort to increase their activity level during working hours. With more than 4% of all working citizens in the United States employed by school systems as teachers, administrators, support staff, nurses, counselors, psychologists, social workers, bus drivers, food service workers, and maintenance staff (U.S. Department of Labor), the school setting is an ideal place to reach a substantial part of the population. The purpose of this study was to determine if a) the act of wearing a pedometer would increase steps taken daily by faculty and staff in a school setting, and b) if motivation and goal setting make a significant difference in the number of steps among faculty and staff wearing pedometers in a school setting. Methodology used in the study involved a control group of 10 people and an intervention group of 10 people. The control group wore pedometers but was not provided daily motivation or goal setting assistance and monitoring during the intervention. The intervention group wore pedometers and were provided daily motivation and weekly goal setting assistance and monitoring during the intervention. Both groups’ weekly steps were collected and analyzed.

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Effects of Prompts, Feedback, and Incentives on "Green Behavior" in College Dorms

Presenter: Mary Ware
Mentor: Dr. Ryan Zayac, Department of Psychology

In this research project our goal was to establish green behaviors among the residents in on campus housing. With permission from the Offices of Student Housing and Residence Life we selected Appleby West, Appleby East, and Hawthorne as the dormitories for our behavior modification experiment. Our goal was to increase recycling, reduce water usage, and reduce energy usage. The data that the research assistants collected five days a week required them to record the amount of water (gallons) and energy (KwH) used, as well as counting bottles and cans then weighing (lbs) the overall amount recycled. For this research study we used a multiple-baseline across settings design to implement the different conditions of intervention in which every condition lasted for a two-week period. Each dorm started out in baseline and then entered various intervention conditions. The conditions in which intervention was implemented were the following conditions: prompting, feedback, feedback and prompting, lottery, and a combined prompting, feedback, and lottery condition. Throughout the conditions of intervention flyers were used to encourage people to engage in green behaviors, visual feedback was placed in the main lobby of the dorms to inform residents of their behavior patterns, and the incentive of winning fifty dollars if weekly goals were met were introduced to each dorm. Throughout the experiment we were able to determine a significant change in recycling, a slight change in energy consumption, and no notable changes made in water usage.

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