APPLY! REQUEST

Oral Presentations

Oral Presentation Winners

April 7th April 8th
1st Place: Erica Kelly
Mentor: Dr. Amber Paulk, Department of Sociology and Family Studies

Neuroticism and Jealousy on Social Media:
Do Personality Traits
Matter?


2nd Place: Alex Edwards & Michael Beaver
Mentor: Dr. Jessica E. Stovall, PhD, Department of Mathematics
Investigating Cardano’s Irreducible Case


3rd Place Tie: Jordan Givens
Mentor: Dr. Isaac Sleadd, Department of Biology
Heat-shock protein expression during temperature
and salinity stress in the Antarctic nemertean
worm Parborlasia corrugatus.


3rd Place Tie: Maisey Hunter
Mentors: Dr. Paul Davidson & Dr. D. Brian Thompson,
Department of Physics and Earth Science
Cultivating Sommerstorffia spinosa (Oomycota),
an obligate predator of loricate rotifers.

1st Place: Haley Boeck
Mentor: Dr. Isaac Sleadd, Department of Biology
Cross-tolerance in the upside-down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana.


2nd Place: Sarah Swafford
Mentor: Dr. Gary Padgett, Department of Secondary Education
A Critical Case Study of Teacher Education Students' Created Memes


3rd Place: Christian Bayens
Mentor: Dr. Brian Thompson, Department of Physics and Earth Science
Comparison of R-line Fluorescence of Emeralds with Their Elemental



All Participants

April 7
Oral Presentations
Location: GUC Loft, Second Floor
April 8
Oral Presentations
Location: GUC Loft, Second Floor
9:30 - 12:00 pm
Nealey Sims
Layla Talley
Maisey Hunter
Tammy Rhodes
Shao-Yu Chen
Erica Kelly
1:00 - 3:30 pm
Michael Beaver & Alex Edwards
Matthew Morgan
Summer Scott
Elly Couch
Jake Harrington
Jordan Givens
9:00 - 12:00 pm
Joseph Dawson
Caleb Lane
Rosmely Hernandez
Joshua Kidd
Hollie Roberts
Mary McDaniel
1:00 - 2:30 pm
Michael Beaver
Haley Boeck
Christian Bayens
Jessica Rikard
Jacob Ezell
Sarah Swafford

Presentation Abstracts


Comparison of R-line Fluorescence of Emeralds with Their Elemental

Presenter: Christian Bayens
Mentor: Dr. Brian Thompson, Department of Physics and Earth Science

Collecting photoluminescence spectra of emeralds from different origins, previously we identified correlations between an emerald's geologic origin and spectral parameters of its luminescence R-lines. In particular, R1-line peak positions from synthetic emeralds occur at shortest wavelength, peaks from non-schist origin natural emeralds occur at similar or longer wavelengths, and peaks from schist origin emeralds occur at longest wavelengths. Here we examine R-line spectral parameters of emeralds collected from specific deposits in Co! lombia, Zambia, and Afghanistan. The first two regions are of interest because currently they rank first and second, respectively, in gem-quality emerald production. Deposits in Afghanistan and a new location in Zambia are recent discoveries with very low production. However, emeralds from these new deposits share geologic characteristics previously associated only with Colombian emeralds. Measuring R1-line peak positions from a number of samples from specific mine locations, we examine their wavelength distribution to determine if this measurement can be used as a marker of an emerald's mine-specific origin. We wish to thank Gemological Institute of America Laboratory, Bangkok for providing emeralds used in this study.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Investigating Cardano’s Irreducible Case

Presenters: Michael Beaver, Alex Edwards
Mentor: Dr. Jessica E. Stovall, PhD, Department of Mathematics

Solving cubic equations is a historically rich problem in mathematics. Unlike with quadratic equations, cubic equations do not have a “cubic formula.” However, over the years many techniques have been presented that often find the solutions of cubic equations. Our research investigates one of these techniques known as Cardano’s Method. This method provides an algebraic technique for solving the general cubic equation. Since its inception, this technique has suffered a signifi! cant drawback. In some instances, the application of Cardano’s Method results in what Cardano termed the “irreducible case.” The irreducible case occurs when a complex number is needed in order to complete the process. We are investigating the relationship among the coefficients of the general cubic equation and the irreducible case. We have determined that these relationships fall into one of three categories: always reducible, always irreducible, or conditionally irreducible. Through our research, we have discovered which relationships fall into each of the aforementioned categories. We are formulating a general algorithm to easily determine whether or not a given cubic equation will produce Cardano’s irreducible case.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

The Grey Fox: Sir Edward Grey and British Foreign Policy, 1904-6

Presenter: Michael Beaver
Mentor: Dr. Jeffrey R. Bibbee, PhD, Department of History and Political Science

When we study the First World War, we must necessarily study the prewar years. Oftentimes we forget that the road to war began not in Sarajevo but in diplomatic boardrooms. In Great Britain prior to 1900, the general view on foreign policy was that of “splendid isolation” as championed by Lord Salisbury. This isolation was quickly abandoned by the new Foreign Secretary Lord Lansdowne beginning in 1900. Lansdowne saw isolation as a threat to British security and interests. Rather than taking an isolationist approach, he active! ly pursued an imperialist agenda to protect British interests in the Far East. In 1904, under pressure in North Africa from the Continental powers, Lansdowne secured the Entente Cordiale with France. Lansdowne himself was always reluctant to secure an agreement with France because he was more interested in the Far East and France was allies with the “great enemy” Russia. His achievement, however, served as the launching point for Sir Edward Grey’s radical break in British foreign policy when he was appointed Foreign Secretary in 1904. Whereas Lansdowne saw little use for the Entente Cordiale, Grey saw great potential and was able to capitalize on it during the First Moroccan Crisis of 1905-6. In this talk, we see how, with shrewd pragmatism, Grey was able to use the Entente to secure the Anglo-Franco-Russian power bloc that firmly placed Britain at the center of European politics.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Cross-tolerance in the upside-down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana

Presenters: Hailey Boeck, Anna Hinson
Mentor: Dr. Isaac Sleadd, Department of Biology

Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are a family of proteins that are produced constitutively and as a result of stressful conditions. They perform chaperone functions, stabilizing new proteins by aiding them in correct folding and also by refolding proteins that are damaged by stress. It has been suggested that HSPs may afford cross-tolerance to certain marine organisms. To explore this possibility, we investigated a potential role for HSPs during cross-tolerance in the upside-down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana. Animals expose! d to acute heat stress (37 °C) and subsequent 24-hour recovery at 26 °C displayed increased salinity tolerance as measured by time to pulsing cessation and loss of responsiveness at 70 ppt. On average, heat-shocked C. xamachana survived 4.5 times longer than control animals following transfer to a hypersaline environment. To our knowledge, this is the first time cross-tolerance has been demonstrated in a true jellyfish. The above data are discussed in combination with protein-level analysis of HSP70 expression, with implications in ecophysiology and invasion biology.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

You are Doing Great! - the Effect of Notification on Player Retention

Presenter: Shao-Yu Chen
Mentor: Dr. Jason Watson, Department of Computer Science and Information Systems

As with any skill, success in competitive player-vs.-player games require consistent practice. However, when a player performs poorly, they become more likely to take breaks in their play time to play another game or stop playing altogether. Players often believe that taking a break from gameplay will improve performance. Prior research found that players returning from breaks consistently perform worse than before they stopped playing. Currently, most games require the players to assess their own performance. If games can record and analyze more compl! ex performance metrics, players may be encouraged to continue playing in order to improve their skills. The present study compares player retention after playing multiple games against a virtual opponent and seeing a notification on performance improvement. Retention is measured by whether the participant chooses to play after first losing three games. In this paper, we present a study that examines how using these performance-related notifications can improve player retention rate, even when players will likely stop playing.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

The Effect of Technology-Enhanced Lessons in the Math Classroom

Presenter: Elly Couch
Mentor: Dr. Cynthia Stenger, Department of Mathematics

As a future math teacher, I am strongly encouraged to incorporate different forms of technology into my teaching methods as a way to enhance my students’ learning and keep my students attentive during class. Many school systems, and more specifically math classrooms, are adopting iPads, Chrome Books, and other forms of technology for their students to use in the classroom. Does using technology really help students understand the math concepts that are being taught? Our research seeks to determine if incorporating technology i! nto a math classroom improves student understanding as compared to no technology. Specifically, we focus on a lesson about projectile motion incorporating a software simulation and a physical model with a flight computer, compared to a traditional lecture. In our technology-enhanced lesson, we taught students about projectile motion by going through the mathematical basics of projectile motion with a rocket flight simulation and a PowerPoint presentation. After the lesson, the students observed a live rocket launch to reinforce the lesson concepts. We attached a flight computer to the rocket to record flight data, and students used the data from the rocket flight to explore the essential mathematical concepts of projectile motion using the software simulation. Early results from regional high school and middle school classrooms indicate improvements as measured by pre-test and post-test assessments for both control and experimental groups.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Evaluation of the Properties of Ethanolamine Carboxylates

Presenter: Joseph Dawson
Mentor: Dr. Chong Qiu, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Hygiene

Recently, it has been shown that gas-phase amines may react with acidic constituents of the atmospheric aerosol and produce stable salts. Some alkylammonium salts are shown to alter particle properties and may affect the environment, human health and the climate. In particular, amines are proposed to be used in large industrial scale carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) and such application consequentially may elevate the gas-phase amine concentrations. Unfortunately, knowledge on these alkylammonium salts remains rather limited. As a result! , we have conducted experiments to synthesize alkylammonium carboxylates and systematically study their properties. Multiple synthesis routes were explored, the best method of isolation was determined, and IR, NMR, density and melting point data were acquired. Measurements on hygroscopicity and thermal stability of the alkylammonium carboxylates were performed as a collaboration between UNA and scientists at New Jersey Institute of Technology. The thermal measurements showed complex decomposition patterns of ethanolamine salts with different anions, suggesting that the influence of particle-phase amines on the aerosol properties may depend heavily on the aerosol chemical composition. The salts of ethanolamine were generally hygroscopic at low Relative Humidity (RH). Our research facilitates the understanding of the impacts of amines to our environment.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Exploration of Transgender Gender Identity and Expression in the South

Presenter: Jacob Ezell
Mentor: Dr. John Hodges, Department of Social Work

“Exploration of Transgender Gender Identity and Expression in the South” is a case study exploring the lives of three transgender women living in Alabama. The goal of this qualitative project is to get the voices of people who are transgender into the current research as many times trans* people are misrepresented and their experiences excluded from research of the larger lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) community. The participants were asked questions about growing up in the South while forming a transgender gender! identity. They were also asked about their gender expression and the transformation of this expression as they began to fully realize their gender identity. The participants’ thoughts on their positive and negative experiences concerning gender are explored as well as their thoughts on what larger society and the social work profession should know about transgender lives. The participants do not represent nor speak for the entirely of the trans* community; however, listening to their stories details the importance of letting trans* people tell their stories. Common experiences and connections can be seen throughout the lives of the three women, and these connections are looked at within the context of current social work and gender research. The rich diversity of experience between the women emerges as one of the core themes of the research: assumptions should not be made based on one’s gender identity as all individuals have unique experiences that deserve recognition! and celebration within society. Lastly, the Social Work stren! gths per spective is applied to their stories.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Heat-shock protein expression during temperature and salinity stress in the Antarctic nemertean worm Parborlasia corrugatus.

Presenter: Jordan Givens
Mentor: Dr. Isaac Sleadd, Department of Biology

In recent years the Antarctic Peninsula has experienced a dramatic increase in annual temperature. The coastal marine environment has previously been extremely cold and stable, and consequently the majority of Antarctic species appear to have lost the ability to elicit a heat-shock response, thus making them ill-equipped to deal with elevated temperatures. The cold-adapted nemertean worm Parborlasia corrugatus is an important benthic scavenger and predator found throughout Antarctica and the! Antarctic Peninsula. To our knowledge, no research has been conducted to analyze P. corrugatus’s cellular response to heat and salinity stress and as a result it is unclear the effect that global climate change will have on these ecologically significant organisms. The goal of this study was to investigate Hsp70 expression using western blotting. Specimens were collected from the Ross Sea and experiments were conducted at McMurdo Station, Antarctica. Animals were exposed to acute heat stress (10°C) or salinity stress (28ppt or 24ppt) and protein levels of HSP70 – a crucial molecular chaperone – were determined. Here, we present our findings and discuss their implications in the context of global climate change.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Net Benefit/Cost Analysis: An Analysis the the Special Voluntary Retirement Incentive Program

Presenter: Jake Harrington
Mentor: Dr. Tanja Blackstone, Department of Sponsored Programs

The new Special Voluntary Retirement Incentive Program (SVRI) is implementing for employees that retire on May 31, 2015. SVRI is offered to help UNA reduce costs, and the participants of the program will receive a lump-sum incentive payment. Dr. Blackstone and I are conducting a cost/benefit analysis of this program. The analysis will consists of independently running what-if simulations on the net benefits and costs of this program. The issues of the program are as follows: a. The proposed program pays incentives to people who would have otherwise retired without the incentive. b. You have to factor in costs of replacing personnel (depending on their skill set some personnel will have to be replaced.) These costs include faculty/staff compensation plus the opportunity costs associated with search committees. c. Also replacement costs - replacing a full professor with an assistant professor may actually cost more. d. Value of the loss of critical expertise. e. Costs of executing the program. The results will predict an estimated true cost of the program. The potential significance of this research project could be outstanding, If the true costs of this program outweigh the benefits, UNA should not do the program. It could cost the University large amounts of money with this program if many participants volunteer.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Techniques for the Rapid Detection of KPC Gene Isolated from Bacteria found in Sputum Samples using PCR Amplification

Presenter: Rosmely Hernandez
Mentor: Dr. Lisa Ann Blankinship, Department of Biology

The emergence and spread of carbapenemase-producing bacteria has become a well-known problem in clinical settings. Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase, KPC, is an enzyme able to provide bacteria with resistance to carbapenems and cephalosporins via hydrolysis of the antibiotic beta-lactam ring. It is of high importance to detect pathogenic organisms containing the KPC gene in order to provide the most effective antibiotic treatment. The purpose of this project was to develop a rap! id detection method for the KPC gene using PCR amplification. PCR primers were designed using the coding sequence for the KPC gene. A KPC positive strain of K. pneumoniae was used as a positive control to test the effectiveness of the PCR amplification. Bacterial isolates obtained from clinical sputum samples and previously tested for their antibiotic resistance profiles will be subject to genomic and plasmid DNA isolation. The DNA isolated will be used to test for the presence of the KPC gene using PCR amplification. It is expected that this project will be successful in the rapid detection of KPC and will save time and money otherwise spent in antibiotic testing. In clinical settings, a correct antibiotic treatment regimen can be provided once the presence of a gene conferring antibiotic resistance has been confirmed.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Cultivating Sommerstorffia spinosa (Oomycota), an obligate predator of loricate rotifers.

Presenter: Maisey Hunter
Mentors: Dr. Paul Davidson & Dr. D. Brian Thompson, Department of Physics and Earth Science

Sommerstorffia spinosa has long been known as an interesting water mold that must capture and feed on loricate rotifers in order to reproduce. The only published means of culturing Sommerstorffia relied on floating onion skin that served as both the substrate for Sommerstorffia attachment and the nutrient base for the rotifer culture (Karling 1952). We introduce a new method of floating plastic microscope slide coverslips as the substrate for Sommerstorffia attachment. We culture rotifers separately in a wheat g! rain medium. Rotifers are rinsed and concentrated over a 20 micron sieve and backwashed into a 3.5 cm diameter dish to which Sommerstorffia-infected coverslips are added. After exposure to rotifers (1-3 hours), the coverslips are rinsed to remove any rotifers not captured by Sommerstorffia and transferred to clean spring water. The rigidity and clarity of coverslips makes them superb substrates providing a ready means for microscopic observations of developmental stages. Coverslips also serve well as components of experiments exploring other aspects of Sommerstorffia’s biology.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Neuroticism and Jealousy on Social Media: Do Personality Traits Matter?

Presenter: Erica Kelly
Mentor: Dr. Amber Paulk, Department of Sociology and Family Studies

Beginning in adolescence and lasting throughout one’s life, romantic relationships offer individuals the opportunity to establish intimate connections and develop critical bonds. In modern society, young people are using social media networking sites and applications as a means to connect with potential romantic partners and publicize the details of their romantic relationships. However, social media sites and applications can have negative effects on romantic relationships and can cause feelings of insecurity and jealousy for some couples. Research has shown that some individuals have greater difficulty in trusting others and are more prone to jealousy. In particular, individuals who score high on measures of Neuroticism have been found to experience more jealousy in romantic relationships. The purpose of the current study is to examine the association between Neuroticism and jealousy across various social media sites and applications that vary in their access exclusivity, which refers to the differences in private versus public information available on a social media sites and applications. It is hypothesized that individuals who score higher on measures of Neuroticism will report higher scores on jealousy across all sites and applications than individuals with lower scores on Neuroticism. It is also hypothesized that individuals who score high on measures of Neuroticism will report significantly higher levels of jealousy on sites that have greater access exclusivity. Data are currently being collected through an online survey. To date, 252 individuals have participated. Data analyses will begin on March 12.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Photoluminescence Spectroscopy of Emerald

Presenter: Joshua Kidd
Mentor: Dr. D. Brian Thompson, Department of Physics and Earth Science

Emerald is a green variety of the mineral beryl. One of the common tasks for gemologists is to decide whether an emerald is natural or synthetic. There is not a single test that can definitively determine this 100% of the time. The task of differentiating between natural and synthetic emeralds is further complicated by the fact that natural and synthetic emeralds are nearly chemically identical. Therefore, gemologists must use a variety of tests to discriminate between natural and synthetic emeralds. Gemological laboratories are ever searching for any new tests to add to their! existing arsenal. I have evaluated a method of photoluminescence spectroscopy that can assist in this task. This method relies on a property of emerald to absorb laser light and re-emit (photoluminesce) the light in the red color range of the visible spectrum. This re-emission's spectral curve takes on the form of a broad background with two sharp R-lines superimposed upon it. The wavelength of these R-lines aid in discerning between natural or synthetic emeralds and in determining an emerald's origin.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Evidence for or against phototaxis in Sommerstorffia spinosa (Oomycota) zoospores

Presenter: Caleb Lane
Mentor: Dr. Paul Davidson & Dr. D. Brian Thompson, Department of Physics and Earth Science

Phototaxis is a common phenomenon in many organisms including zoosporic fungi (chytrids) but appears undocumented for the fungal-like oomycetes. Phototactic responses include movement towards or away from a light source. In our cultures of the oomycete Sommerstorffia spinosa, zoospores often concentrate at the water's surface; they probably swim upwards due to an inherent negative geotaxis that has been postulated for all oomycete zoospores (Carlile 1986). Here we examined the effect of light on zoospore movement, testing the hypoth! esis that zoospores exhibit a phototactic response. Preliminary results support negative phototaxis, a potential adaptation to target (and eventually adhere to) the underside of submerged surfaces where rotifers that Sommerstorffia must feed upon are known to graze. Our experimental design uses a collimated light source directly above a culture dish that illuminates half the dish while the other half is kept dark. We used both horizontal and vertical plastic microscope slide coverslips as capture surfaces to determine the final distribution of zoospores.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

THE VARIABILITY OF Hα, Hβ, AND Hγ EQUIVALENT WIDTHS IN DELTA SCORPIUS BETWEEN 2001 AND 2014

Presenter: Mary McDaniel
Mentor: Dr. R. Melvin Blake, Department of Physics and Earth Science

Focusing on three of the Balmer hydrogen-lines' equivalent widths, we obtained our data from the Be Star Spectra Database, or BeSS, between the dates of May 2001 to August 2014 in order to determine a trend, if any, in the equivalent width measurements of the first three Balmer hydrogen lines for Delta Scorpius. Equivalent width is the area of the spectral peak with respect to the continuum. It describes the strength of the hydrogen line which allowed us to theoretically track the variability in the amount of ionized hydrogen being emitted from within the circumstellar disk. We show that there is a direct correlation between the equivalent widths and the apparent visual magnitude, the brightness of the star as viewed from Earth, of Delta Scorpius. Thus, allowing us to theoretically observe changes in the density, shape, composition, and size of the circumstellar disk. Our theory is that the density, composition, shape, and size of the disk changed, therefore, changing the optical depth of the star.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Photoluminescence R-line spectral parameters of emeralds from Colombia, Zambia, and Afghanistan.

Presenter: Matthew Morgan
Mentor: Dr. Brian Thompson, Department of Physics and Earth Science

Collecting photoluminescence spectra of emeralds from different origins, previously we identified correlations between an emerald's geologic origin and spectral parameters of its luminescence R-lines. In particular, R1-line peak positions from synthetic emeralds occur at shortest wavelength, peaks from non-schist origin natural emeralds occur at similar or longer wavelengths, and peaks from schist origin emeralds occur at longest wavelengths. Here we examine R-line spectral parameters of emeralds ! collected from specific deposits in Colombia, Zambia, and Afghanistan. The first two regions are of interest because currently they rank first and second, respectively, in gem-quality emerald production. Deposits in Afghanistan and a new location in Zambia are recent discoveries with very low production. However, emeralds from these new deposits share geologic characteristics previously associated only with Colombian emeralds. Measuring R1-line peak positions from a number of samples from specific mine locations, we examine their wavelength distribution to determine if this measurement can be used as a marker of an emerald's mine-specific origin. We wish to thank Gemological Institute of America Laboratory, Bangkok for providing emeralds used in this study.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

The New Famous: Deconstructing Social Media Girl-Fights

Presenter: Tammy Rhodes
Mentor: Dr. Andrea Hunt, Department of Sociology and Family Studies

Female juvenile delinquency continues to hold the interests of sociologists and criminologists around the world. Criminologists in the United States examine the issues concerning poverty and parental neglect and the effects on juvenile females. Specifically, practitioners gather data that construct findings to support programs which assist with juvenile females who end up in the criminal justice system through parental neglect or juvenile delinquency. Even with information from feminist criminologists about female juvenile delinquency in m! inority communities in the United States, we lack adequate understanding of the new social media phenomenon of young girls filming themselves as they fight, then posting those fights on social media sites. The issues addressed in this presentation will be the media exploitation of young girls through urban blogs and the response, or lack of response, from the hip hop community and how this urges these young juveniles to continue these fights. The concern of juvenile delinquency from a socioeconomic view and subsequent break down caused by parental neglect eventually affects others in society through those juveniles who choose to commit these acts of inappropriate behavior. By gathering data showing that preventive and rehabilitative measures are needed, communities can build programs with academic settings to assist juveniles as they prepare these juveniles to enter institutions of higher education or transition directly into the workforce.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Songwriting as Investigation: A self reflective analysis of the transition from student to teacher

Presenter: Jessica Rikard
Mentor: Dr. Gary Padgett, Department of Secondary Education

Performance is often used as a means of qualitative research, and this study combines those methods with song writing.  According to Janesick (2004) research and other aspects of one’s life, such as artistic expressions, can and are combined in qualitative research.  In this study, song writing serves as both a form of investigation and representation.  My original song is a combination of my experience and research with others going through the transition from student to teacher.  One of the hardest challenges is going from being a mentee to being a mentor.  All of my mentors have pushed me beyond my comfort zone to achieve greatness.  How can I be a good mentor to my students when I still rely so heavily on my own mentors?

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Endometriosis: Effectiveness of Laparoscopic Removal as Treatment Option

Presenter: Hollie Roberts
Mentor: Dr. Laura Williams, Department of Nursing (Traditional)

Endometriosis is a chronic condition that affects a large number of women in a variety of ways. Some cases may be mild while others are severe. Regardless, the availability of treatment options for either are limited and with questionable effectiveness. Hormone therapy and nonsteriodal anti-inflammatory drugs are the primary treatment. However, laparoscopic removal of endometrial tissue located outside of the uterus is a rising treatment method. The aim of this systematic review is to look at the effectiveness of laparoscopic removal of en! dometriosis. Although there are different techniques used for removal, the primary focus of laparoscopic surgery is to resolve certain symptoms of endometriosis as well as recurrence rates after surgery. The databases CINAHL Plus with Full Text, Academic Search Complete, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, and MEDLINE were searched for documents written in English and published between the years of 2010 and 2015. The results of the articles selected show that laparoscopic removal of endometriosis does reduce the number and intensity of endometriosis-associated symptoms. In some cases, laparoscopic removal also reduced rates of recurrence post-surgery.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Technology and Social Media in the Workplace and How They Affect Organizational Relationships

Presenter: Summer Scott
Mentor: Dr. Jeremy O. Stafford, Department of Management and Marketing

The nature of this study was to investigate the way technology and social media integrated into the workplace affects organizational relationships. With society becoming increasingly dependent on these variables in everyday life, we sought to examine the effect they have on relationships, specifically between upper-level management and employees. This was studied when technology and social media had and had not been assimilated into the job itself. I examined social media and technology use policies by well-known, es! tablished businesses and will collect data via a survey given to college students enrolled in business courses at the University of North Alabama. Conclusions drawn from several research studies found that individual attitude, perception, behavior, job performance, and productivity were affected by the restriction of the use of technology and social media in the workplace. Key employment relationship dynamics such as trust and commitment to organizations have also been influenced by integrated technology into said organizations (whether for personal or organizational use). Not only have the individuals’ feelings toward the entire organization been affected, but employee-employer relationships have been put on shaky ground as well.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

Correlation of Upper Cretaceous (Santonian-Maastrichtian) Depositional Sequences of Eastern Alabama

Presenter: Nealey Sims
Mentor: Dr. Mark Puckett, Department of Physics and Earth Science

The Upper Cretaceous (Santonian-Maastrichtian) strata of eastern Alabama (Russell and Barbour Counties) include three unconformity-bound, marine depositional sequences that are richly fossiliferous. For this research, outcrop sections of the Blufftown Formation, Cusseta and Providence Sands were measured and described at eight locations and samples were collected for their microfossil content, particularly ostracodes and planktonic foraminifera. Previous biostratigraphic and sequence stratigraphic studies in ! central Alabama and eastern Mississippi established composite reference sections that were used to correlate and date the strata in eastern Alabama. Electric well log data and lithologic descriptions from water wells in the area were used to determine the elevations of the tops of the Blufftown and Eutaw Formations. From these data, structure contour maps were prepared to correlate the sections lithostratigraphically. Samples collected from the lower Blufftown Formation are assigned to the Veenia quadrialira Taxon Range of mid-Santonian age. Samples collected from the upper Blufftown Formation are assigned to the Ascetoleberis plummeri Taxon Range Zone of mid-Campanian age. Samples including the chronostratigraphically-significant planktonic foraminiferan Rugotruncana calcarata of mid-Campanian age were found in the upper part of a measured section in the Cusseta Formation, and are assigned to the Escharacytheridea pinochii Interval Zone. A sample collected from the Providence Sand just south of Eufaula is equivalent to the Floricythereis lixula Interval Zone of Maastrichtian age. According to the results of this research, the ranges of several species will be extended and will result in improved, high-resolution chronostratigraphic ranges of the species.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

A Critical Case Study of Teacher Education Students' Created Memes

Presenter: Sarah Swafford
Mentor: Dr. Gary Padgett, Department of Secondary Education

The purpose of this research is to determine pre-service teachers’ perspectives on the teaching field. By having the students create a meme, this research can analyze assumption and perspectives that may not be revealed in another evaluative measurement, such as a survey. Qualitative methods have often relied on participant created works of art to analyze beliefs and perspectives. Research relating this to internet memes has been around for almost twenty years (Downes, S.,1999; Heylighen, F.,1996! ;. Knobel, M., & Lankshear, C.,2007), but no one has yet to combine this with the field of education research. Critical case studies (Rubin and Rubin, 2005; Janesick, 2004) have been cited numerous times as a valid research method and are used in this study to analyze the memes. This research will reveal the students perceptions of the teaching field, encouraging future research on how to utilize those perspectives to create better curricula, experiences, and opportunities.

  [Back to Top]

 

 

The Power in Masculinity: The Reasons Behind Joseph McCarthy's Lavender Scare and the Effects

Presenter: Layla Talley
Mentor: Dr. Ansley Quiros, Department of History and Political Science

The Lavender Scare within the Red Communist scare was a time of persecution of homosexual individuals. David Johnson wrote the first detailed look at the scare in 2004 in his monograph, The Lavender Scare. While his book was both informative and interesting, it failed to give a good reason the scare began or some of the bigger and lasting ramifications of the scare. By reading the transcripts from Senate hearings for individuals accused of "sexual deviance," accounts from those who knew Senator McCarthy, and data obtained from psychological experiments dealing with homophobia and masculinity , I explore the possibility that threats to Senator Joseph McCarthy's masculinity were primary motivating factors for his attack on the gay community. Using mention of different organizations opening chapters in the D.C. area and by studying the background of individuals working for some of the first publications aimed at homosexuals, I also draw connections between the earliest part of the gay rights movement and the scare, and argue that this period was actually the beginnings rather the Stonewall Riots which have been used as a jumping off point until now

  [Back to Top]