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English Department Undergraduate Courses

ENGLISH (EN)

Completion of one sophomore literature course and concurrent enrollment in the second sophomore literature course is prerequisite to all courses in English numbered 300 and above.

EN 099. (0) Basic English.

A noncredit course in basic grammar and composition required of all students with scores of 15 or below on the ACT English Subtest. Counts as three semester hours in determining hour load. Grading is S (Satisfactory) or U (Unsatisfactory). On a grade of U the student may repeat the course; on a grade of S the student proceeds to enrollment in English 111. English 099 may be repeated only once; after the second term in English 099 the student, no matter what the grade, must proceed to enrollment in English 111. (Fall, Spring)

EN 101. (2-4) English as a Second Language I.

 An introduction to spoken and written English for students who are not native speakers of the language. Placement by TOEFL
examination and/or by departmental recommendation only.

EN 102. (2-4) English as a Second Language II.

 A continuation of training in spoken and written English for students who are not native speakers of the language. Prerequisite: EN 101 or departmental placement.

EN 111. (3)First-Year Composition I.

An introduction to expository writing, rhetoric, and reading. The acquisition of the basic skills in standard English is stressed. Grades in EN 111 are A, B, C, NC (no credit). Students receiving a grade of NC must repeat the course. (See Department of English narrative) (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 112. (3) First-Year Composition II.

 A continuation of training in expository writing and reading, stressing the acquisition of higher-level skills in standard English and the introduction to the basic tools and processes of academic research. Grades in EN 112 are A, B, C, NC (no credit). Students receiving a grade of NC must repeat the course. (see Department of English narrative) Prerequisite: EN 111. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 121. (3) First-Year Composition  Honors.

 Accelerated training in expository writing and reading taken in lieu of English 111 by superior freshman students selected on the basis of placement tests. Grades in EN 121 are A, B, C, NC (no credit). (See Department of English narrative) Students receiving a grade of NC in English 121 must enroll in the regular Freshman English sequence, beginning with English 111. (Fall)

EN 122. (3) First-Year Composition II Honors II.

 A continuation of the accelerated training begun in English 121, stressing the development of advanced skills in several modes of composition as well as the acquisition and development of skills in academic research. Grades in EN 122 are A, B, C, NC (no credit). (See Department of English narrative) Students receiving a grade of NC in English 122 complete the sequence by enrolling in English 112. Prerequisite: EN 121. (Spring)

EN 211. (3) Survey of English Literature.

The development of English literature as an expression of English culture from Beowulf through Neoclassicism. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 212. (3) Survey of English Literature.

A continuation of English 311 from the Pre-Romantics to the present. Recommended in sequence. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 221. (3) American Literature through Whitman.

Major American poets and prose writers of the period. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 222. (3) American Literature from Whitman to the Present.

Major American poets and prose writers of the period. Recommended in sequence. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 231. (3) Literature of the World I.

A survey of selections from the great literature of the western world, covering major writers of the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Prerequisite: EN 112 or 122. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 232. (3) Literature of the World II.

A continuation of the study of the great works of the western world, covering writers from the Neoclassic to the Modern Ages. Prerequisite:
EN 112 or 122. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 233. (3) Honors Studies in Literature of the World I.

An intensive survey of the literature of the western world through the Renaissance. In-depth reading in the works of selected authors will be required and written reports and/or research projects will be expected of each student. Prerequisite: EN 122 or departmental approval. (Fall)

EN 234. (3) Honors Studies in WestLiterature of the World II.

 An intensive study of the literature of the western world from the period of Neoclassicism to the Modern Age. In-depth reading of the works of selected authors will be required and written reports and/or research projects will be expected of each student. (Spring)

EN 300W. (3) Technical Writing.

Training in such writing as may be necessary in certain professional and scientific fields. Emphasis is placed on writing of memoranda, letters, technical reports, and research reports. (Spring, odd-numbered years; Summer, even-numbered years)

EN 301. (3) Romantic Poetry.

Extensive reading in Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. (Fall, even-numbered years)

EN 302. (3) Romantic and Victorian Poetry.

Extensive reading in the works of major poets of two important literary periods. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

EN 303. (3) Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature.

Extensive reading in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 304. (3) Honors Seminar–Literature.

A seminar for students in the honors sequence in English. Concentrated study in specific narrow areas of literature. Prerequisite: 12 hours of honors courses in English or departmental approval. (Fall)

EN 305. (3) African-American Women Writers.

An examination of the writings of African-American women beginning with the slave narrative and ending with contemporary
poetry, fiction, and drama. Also listed as WS 305 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 306. (3) Introduction to English Linguistics.

Introduction to concepts of English linguistics such as phonology, morphology, syntax, acquisition, and variation.

EN 307.  (3)  Approaches to Film Studies

An introduction to the study of cinema, including, including analysis of film language (cinematography, editing, and, and misen-scene) as well as narrative construction. Films and clips are drawn from various national cinemas, representing diverse styles, periods, and genres.  (Fall, Spring)

EN 309.  (3)  Film Theory and Criticism.

An introduction to film theory and criticism, focusing on the theorists, movements, and critical practices in film studies.  (Spring)

EN 315.  (3)  History of Film.

The historical development of the motion picture and television film as an art form from earliest stages to the present, including the technical, social, economic, and cultural factors influencing development, and using films from periods and genres.  Also listed as COM 300 and TH 300, but creditable only in the field for which registered.  (Spring)

EN 323. (3) Literature for Young People.

Literature suitable for instructional and recreational use by middle school/junior high school and high school students. (Spring; Fall, even-numbered years)

EN 324. (3) The Oral Tradition.

An examination of the structure, genres, and differing attitudes of written and oral literature as well as those periods in literary history in which oral literature has flourished. (Spring, odd–numbered years; Summer even-numbered years)

EN 331. (3) World Literature.

Reading of world literature in translation, from Greek
classics to the modern Russian novel. (Spring, odd-numbered years; Summer, even-numberedyears)

EN 333. (3) Images of Women in Literature.

An examination of images of women in literature drawn primarily from the works of women writers in English and American literature of
the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; an introduction to feminist criticism. Also listed as WS333 but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 341W. (3) Advanced Composition.

Practice in expository writing beyond that offered by Freshman Composition. (Fall; Spring, odd-numbered years)

EN 360. (3) Literary Criticism.

Major critical trends in literary theory, with emphasis on criticism since 1965, including feminist, Marxist, structuralist and deconstructive approaches to literature. Exploration on these theories and analysis of selected works of literature. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 371. (3) English Drama.

English Drama from its sources through the nineteenth century, excluding Shakespeare. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 391.  (3)  Film Authors

An intense study of the films of a major filmmaker or group of filmmakers, with an emphasis on how their work contributed to the development of the art of film.  Students will become engaged with directors from around the world who, based on their body of work, help one see the cultural, historical, and social significance of their works in cinematic history.  (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 392.  (3)  Film Genres

The course focuses on a particular film style or genre with particular emphasis on genre study.  Sample topics might include Film Comedy; Science Fiction; The Western; Avant-Garde Film; Documentary Film; German Expressionism; Neorealism.  (Fall, odd-numbered years)

EN 393 W.  (3)  Screenwriting

A course designed for film studies students that explores the theory and practice of writing screenplays.  Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of narrative structure.  Students write original scenes and also a finished script.  (Offered on sufficient demand.)

EN 394.  (3)  Perspectives in European Film

A survey of selected or individual European cinemas with a focus on major narrative films and the cultural and historical contexts from which they derive.  (Fall, even-numbered years)

EN 395.  (3) World Cinema. 

A survey of key tendencies in international cinema from the silent era to the present day.  (Offered on sufficient demand.)

EN 396 W.  (3)  Writing about Film

A study of a selected period or subject in film.  Topics might include censorship in cinema; national cinemas; film movements; spirituality in film; race and cinema; film rhetoric; or adaption.  (Spring, odd-numbered years or on sufficient demand)

EN 401. (3) Chaucer.

The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and most of the minor poems. (Fall, even-numbered years; Summer, odd-numbered years)

EN 402. (3) Milton.

Although some prose works are studied, the emphasis is upon Milton as a poet. (Fall, odd-numbered years; Summer, even-numbered years)

EN 403. (3) Shakespeare.

Major plays for understanding and appreciation. (Fall, Spring)

EN 405. (3) African-American Literature.

An investigation of the development of African-American literature and an examination of selected writers of poetry, drama, fiction, and
nonfiction. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

EN 439W. (3) Technical Editing.

Training in copy editing and practice in substantive editing skills in content, organization, and format. Students will focus on using typographic conventions, scientific symbols, style manuals, and publication guides. (Fall, even-numbered
years)

EN 441. (3) History of the English Language.

Development of the English languageand of modern English usage. (Fall; Summer, odd-numbered years)

EN 442. (3) Survey of Grammar.

A survey of approaches to English grammar based on approaches now used in most school texts. Prerequisite: EN 441 or written permission of department chair. (Spring, odd-numbered years; Summer, even-numbered years)

EN 443. (3) Instruction of Composition.

Approaches to and practice in the instruction of English composition. (Fall, Spring, Summer, odd-numbered years)

EN 445W (3) New Media Writing. A combination of theory and application of new media writing--electronic, interactive, and multi-media text. (Spring, even-numbered years.

EN 450. (3) Studies in American Folklore.

A study of the sources, backgrounds, and forms of American folklore. Introduction to the field. Emphasis is given to research methods and
to field work. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 451. (3) The American Novel.

From the beginning of the American novel to the twentieth century. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 452. (3) The American Novel.

Intensive study of the works of selected American authors. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 453. (3) The English Novel.

Representative works in the development of the English novel. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 454. (3) The English Novel.

Intensive study of selected English authors. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 455W. (3) Creative Writing.

A practical approach to learning literary techniques through lecture, discussion, and conference with the instructor on individual student works. Prerequisite: written permission of the chair of the department. (Fall)

EN 456W. (3) Advanced Creative Writing.

A practical approach to literary techniques and writing for publication, with special emphasis on structure, theme, and characterization. Class discussion will be supplemented by conferences with the instructor. Prerequisite: EN 455. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 460. (3) Literature of the American Frontier

An examination of the literature of the American frontier, beginning with authors such as James Fenimore Cooper and moving forward to modern writers such as Cormac McCarthy. Emphasis is on the changing perspective of the frontier as it progressed from the East coast to the West.

EN 463. (3) Contemporary World Literature.

A study of the changing forms and themes of recent world literature from 1950 to the present. (Fall, odd-numbered years)

EN 464. (3) The Contemporary American Novel.

A study of the changing forms and emerging themes of the American novel since 1950. (Fall, even-numbered years)

EN 465. (3) Contemporary Poetry.

Extensive reading in the works of contemporary British and American poets, with emphasis on their relationship to the literary traditions of the past and their innovations and experiments in matter and form. (Spring, even-numbered years)

EN 472W. (3)Rhetoric: Argument and Style.

An examination of the ideas in writing and speech from classical Greek origins to modern times, with a focus on composition and on analysis of essays and speeches. Also listed as COM 472W but creditable only in field for which registered. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

EN 489W (3) Professional Writing Portfolio Workshop. This three-credit writing workshop is the capstone course for those English majors pursuing the option in
Profession Writing.  Each student will create a Professional Writing Portfolio to be submitted for departmental assessment.  Each portfolio will be evaluated on a
pass/fail basis by three English Department faculty members.  Students who successfully complete En 489W will have their Professional Writing Portfolio
Hold released so that they can file for graduation; students who fail EN 489W must subsequently register for an Independent Study to revise their portfolios
for another pass/fail assessment. (Spring, odd-numbered years)

EN 490. (3) English Internship/Practicum.

Special problems and projects emphasizing practical experience in professional job situations in writing through field assignments under departmental supervision. Prerequisite: written permission of the chair of the department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

EN 494. (3) Selected Topics in Film Studies.

A study of a selected period or subject in film. Topics might include censorship in cinema; women in film; avant-garde cinema; national cinemas; film movements, spirituality in film; race and cinema; film rhetoric; or adaptation. (Spring, odd-numbered years or on sufficient demand)

EN 495. (3) Selected Topics in Composition.

Designed to provide concentrated study in specific areas of written composition. Prerequisite: EN 443. (Offered on sufficient demand)

EN 496. (3) Selected Topics in English Literature.

Concentrated study in specific narrow areas of English literature. Prerequisites: EN 311, 312. (Spring, odd-numbered years, if demand sufficient)

EN 497. (3) Selected Topics in American Literature.

Concentrated study in narrow areas of American literature. Prerequisites: EN 321, 322. (Fall, even-numbered years, if demand sufficient)

EN 498. (3) Selected Topics in Literature.

Concentrated study in specific narrow areas of world literature. (Spring, even-numbered years, if demand sufficient)

EN 499. (3) Independent Study.

Open to senior majors on approval of department head. Provides for independent study or research under departmental determination, supervision, and evaluation. Prerequisite: written permission of the chair of the department. (Fall, Spring, Summer)

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